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...Introduction In this course, we investigate the stark disparities in nutritional well-being around the world and seek to understand in what ways agricultural systems of food production have played a role. Much of the food that we eat has...

Potassium

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Potassium (K) is found in virtually all aerobic cells and is essential to life. It is the third most abundant element in the human body (after calcium and phosphorus) and the eighth most abundant element in the earth’s crust, with a mass...

Quantitative Methods In Food Studies Research

Jeff Miller

Jeff Miller, Colorado State University. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and

Jonathan Deutsch

Jonathan Deutsch is professor and program director in the Department of Hospitality Management, Culinary Arts, and Food Science at Goodwin College, Drexel University, USA, Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Food Studies : An Introduction to Research Methods

Bloomsbury Academic, 2009

Book chapter

...Quantitative research methods in food studies are the methods that we use when we want to explain, predict, or control phenomena of interest (Gay, Mills, and Airasian, 2006). When we have data that we can express, measure, and analyze using...

Essential Fatty Acids

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The history of the scientific documentation of the need for fat in the diet began with the early nineteenth-century work of Michel Eugene Chevreul (Mayer and Hanson 1960). He showed that lard contained a solid fat, which he termed stearine,...

Food Allergies

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Adverse Food Reactions and Allergies An adverse food reaction is defined as any untoward reaction following...

The Cardiovascular System, Coronary Artery Disease, and Calcium: A Hypothesis

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The Circulation The central organ of the human circulatory system, the heart, must be among the most remarkable creations of nature. In the longest-living individuals, it works continuously...

Infection and Nutrition: Synergistic Interactions

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The interactions of malnutrition and infection are synergistic, with each modifying the other in ways that cannot be predicted from studying just one condition or the other (Scrimshaw, Taylor, and Gordon 1968). The superimposed infection...

Nutrition and Mental Development

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Most research on nutrition and human mental development has focused on protein–energy malnutrition (PEM), which consists of deficits in energy and protein as well as other nutrients (Golden 1988). But there is also an extensive literature...

Phosphorus

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Phosphorus (abbreviated as P) is a highly toxic element, which, when it occurs in the form of a phosphate salt, becomes a nutrient essential for human health. Phosphates are found in practically every type of food and, consequently...

Vitamin K and Vitamin K–Dependent Proteins

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The term “vitamin K” was first introduced by Henrik Dam in 1935, following discovery of a fat-soluble substance that could prevent bleeding (Dam 1935, 1964). During the years 1928 to 1930, Dam conducted studies on the cholesterol metabolism...