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Vitamin K and Vitamin K–Dependent Proteins

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The term “vitamin K” was first introduced by Henrik Dam in 1935, following discovery of a fat-soluble substance that could prevent bleeding (Dam 1935, 1964). During the years 1928 to 1930, Dam conducted studies on the cholesterol metabolism...

Nonfoods as Dietary Supplements

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Food: A substance (of natural origin) ingested to maintain life and growth. Diet: The habitual pattern of consumption of food and drink.Supplement: That which supplies a deficiency or fulfills a need.The semantically inclined will,...

Quantitative Methods In Food Studies Research

Jeff Miller

Jeff Miller, Colorado State University. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and

Jonathan Deutsch

Jonathan Deutsch is professor and program director in the Department of Hospitality Management, Culinary Arts, and Food Science at Goodwin College, Drexel University, USA, Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Food Studies : An Introduction to Research Methods

Bloomsbury Academic, 2009

Book chapter

...Quantitative research methods in food studies are the methods that we use when we want to explain, predict, or control phenomena of interest (Gay, Mills, and Airasian, 2006). When we have data that we can express, measure, and analyze using...

Anthropological Approaches to Agriculture, Food, and Nutrition

Elizabeth Hull

Lecturer in Anthropology, SOAS University of London Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Lesson plan

...Introduction In this course, we investigate the stark disparities in nutritional well-being around the world and seek to understand in what ways agricultural systems of food production have played a role. Much of the food that we eat has...

Potassium

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Potassium (K) is found in virtually all aerobic cells and is essential to life. It is the third most abundant element in the human body (after calcium and phosphorus) and the eighth most abundant element in the earth’s crust, with a mass...

Nutrition and Mental Development

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Most research on nutrition and human mental development has focused on protein–energy malnutrition (PEM), which consists of deficits in energy and protein as well as other nutrients (Golden 1988). But there is also an extensive literature...

Phosphorus

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Phosphorus (abbreviated as P) is a highly toxic element, which, when it occurs in the form of a phosphate salt, becomes a nutrient essential for human health. Phosphates are found in practically every type of food and, consequently...

Vitamin B Complex: Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Pyridoxine, Cobalamin, Folic Acid

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The history of the discovery of the B vitamins includes both the recognition that particular diseases can result from dietary inadequacies and the subse quent isolation of specific nutrients from foods that have been found to prevent...

Sodium and Hypertension

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Historically, dietary salt (sodium chloride) has been obtained by numerous methods, including solar evaporation of seawater, the boiling down of water from brine springs, and the mining of “rock” salt (Brisay and Evans 1975). In fact,R. P....

Iron

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Iron has played a critical role in the evolution of life. The ancient Greeks, believing iron to be a special gift sent to earth by one of the gods, named it sideros, or star (Liebel, Greenfield, and Pollitt 1979). As the second most common...