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Locating the ‘Kitchen’

Sara Pennell

Sara Pennell is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Greenwich, UK. She is the co-editor, along with Michelle DiMeo, of Reading and Writing Recipe Books, 1550–1800 (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Birth of the English Kitchen, 1600–1850

Bloomsbury Academic, 2016

Book chapter

...‘The first foundation of a good house must be the kitchen.’ Richard Surflet , transl., Maison Rustique or The Countries Farme (...

Trick or Treat? How to Wine and Dine (as a Group) for Free

Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs, Director, Vlaams Centrum Volkscultuur, Brussels Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Eating Out in Europe : Picnics, Gourmet Dining and Snacks since the Late Eighteenth Century

Berg, 2003

Book chapter

...No Free Lunch ‘There is no such thing as a free lunch.’ This American proverb illustrates that strings tend to be attached to food offered for free. On the website of the no-free-lunch organization (...

Healthy Food: The Fall and Rise of Dietetics, c.1650–c.1800

David Gentilcore

David Gentilcore is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Leicester, UK. He is the author of Pomodoro! (2010) and Medical Charlatanism in Early Modern Italy (2006). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Food and Health in Early Modern Europe : Diet, Medicine and Society, 1450–1800

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...Introduction In 1763 a 44-year-old miller in the Essex town of Billericay decided he had had enough of his obesity. The sense of suffocation Thomas Wood felt after eating only added to his head...
...Recent scholarship on drinking establishments—alehouses, taverns, public houses, and cabarets—demonstrates their importance in the social history of alcohol. In addition to dispensing alcoholic beverages, drinking establishments had...

Conclusion: Eating to Impress

Paul S. Lloyd

Paul S. Lloyd is University Tutor and Part-time Lecturer at the University of Leicester, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Food and Identity in England, 1540–1640 : Eating to Impress

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...The century between the Reformation and the Civil Wars was marked by changing religious values that had an impact on many aspects of life. It was also marked by socioeconomic polarization that, against a backdrop of appreciable demographic...

Cooking as Research Methodology: Experiments in Renaissance Cuisine

Ken Albala

Ken Albala is Professor of History at the University of the Pacific and chair of the Food Studies MA program in San Francisco. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Food History: Critical and Primary Sources : Classical and Postclassical Eras

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Book chapter

...This essay seeks to redress a long-standing epistemological division in food scholarship. The radical separation of academic food historians from culinary historians and practitioners has had various deleterious effects. One is the tendency...

The ‘Meaner Sort’ and Their Diets

Paul S. Lloyd

Paul S. Lloyd is University Tutor and Part-time Lecturer at the University of Leicester, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Food and Identity in England, 1540–1640 : Eating to Impress

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...with that the children cry’d. Anon ., A New Ballad, Shewing the Great Misery Sustained by a Poore Man in Essex, His...

The ‘Power House’: Technologies in the Kitchen

Sara Pennell

Sara Pennell is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Greenwich, UK. She is the co-editor, along with Michelle DiMeo, of Reading and Writing Recipe Books, 1550–1800 (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

The Birth of the English Kitchen, 1600–1850

Bloomsbury Academic, 2016

Book chapter

...Darley, ‘The power house‘, 106.The appraisers open the door, and survey the room before them. It is January 1603 and they are taking note of the worldly goods of Richard Francklyn, shoemaker of Farnham (Surrey). Francklyn occupied...

Banquets Against Boredom: Towards Understanding (Samurai) Cuisine in Early Modern Japan

Food History: Critical and Primary Sources : Global Contact and Early Industrialization

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Book chapter

...“The pleasures of the table belong to all times and all ages, to every country and every day; they go hand in hand with all our other pleasures, outlast them, and remain to console us for their loss.” The Physiology of Taste...

Old People, Alcohol and Identity in Europe, 1300–1700

Food, Drink and Identity : Cooking, Eating and Drinking in Europe Since the Middle Ages

Berg, 2001

Book chapter

...The depiction of January in the fifteenth-century calendar of Les Belles Heures de Jean Due de Berry shows a young man and an old man sitting back to back. The young man, representing the new year, drinks wine from a cup. The old man...