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Vitamin K and Vitamin K–Dependent Proteins

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The term “vitamin K” was first introduced by Henrik Dam in 1935, following discovery of a fat-soluble substance that could prevent bleeding (Dam 1935, 1964). During the years 1928 to 1930, Dam conducted studies on the cholesterol metabolism...

Nonfoods as Dietary Supplements

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Food: A substance (of natural origin) ingested to maintain life and growth. Diet: The habitual pattern of consumption of food and drink.Supplement: That which supplies a deficiency or fulfills a need.The semantically inclined will,...

Introduction

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...We began work on the Cambridge History and Culture of Food and Nutrition Project even as we were still reading the page proofs for The Cambridge World History of Human Disease, published in 1993. At some point in that effort we had begun...

Vitamin B Complex: Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Pyridoxine, Cobalamin, Folic Acid

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The history of the discovery of the B vitamins includes both the recognition that particular diseases can result from dietary inadequacies and the subse quent isolation of specific nutrients from foods that have been found to prevent...

Llamas and Alpacas

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The llama (Lama glama) and alpaca (Lama pacos) are among the few domesticated ungulates whose most important function has not been that of providing food for the people who control them. The llama has been kept primarily as a beast...

The Social and Cultural Uses of Food

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Food is what Marcel Mauss (1967) called a “total social fact.” It is a part of culture that is central, connected to many kinds of behavior, and infinitely meaningful. Food is a prism that absorbs a host of assorted cultural phenomena...

Sodium and Hypertension

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Historically, dietary salt (sodium chloride) has been obtained by numerous methods, including solar evaporation of seawater, the boiling down of water from brine springs, and the mining of “rock” salt (Brisay and Evans 1975). In fact,R. P....

Iron

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Iron has played a critical role in the evolution of life. The ancient Greeks, believing iron to be a special gift sent to earth by one of the gods, named it sideros, or star (Liebel, Greenfield, and Pollitt 1979). As the second most common...

Rye

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Rye As a GrassRye (Secale cereale L.) is closely related to the genus Triticum (which includes bread wheat, durum wheat, spelt, and the like) and has sometimes been included within that genus (Mansfeld 1986: 1447). In fact, it was possible...

Dogs

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...The Dog as Human FoodThe difficulty that confronts one at the very beginning of a study of the dog as human food is the lack of convincing evidence relating to the use of dogs (Canis familiaris) as food by early humans. Most...