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The Question of Paleolithic Nutrition and Modern Health: From the End to the Beginning

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

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...A conviction has been growing among some observers that contemporary human health could be substantially improved if we would just emulate our hunter–gatherer ancestors in dietary matters. A look at this contention seems an appropriate way...

Rye

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

0

...Rye As a GrassRye (Secale cereale L.) is closely related to the genus Triticum (which includes bread wheat, durum wheat, spelt, and the like) and has sometimes been included within that genus (Mansfeld 1986: 1447). In fact, it was possible...

American Bison

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

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...The American bison (Bison bison) is more closely related to cattle than to true buffalo, such as the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Nonetheless, early European settlers called the unfamiliar animal they encountered in North America...

Bananas and Plantains

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

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...Bananas represent one of the most important fruit crops, second only to grapes in the volume of world production (Purseglove 1988). J. F. Morton (1987) indicates that bananas are the fourth largest fruit crop after grapes, citrus fruits...

Vitamin E

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

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...As any nutritional text dated prior to 1970 will indicate, vitamin E has not received much respect from nutritionists. In such texts it is often placed after vitamin K, in the miscellaneous category. This is because it took a good 40 years...

Game

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

0

...Evolutionary UnderpinningsGame (defined here as the meat of wild mammals, birds, and terrestrial reptiles) has been an important component of the human diet since earliest times. A signal difference between the digestive system of humans...

Sheep

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

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...Probably the earliest domesticated herd animal in the Old World, the sheep (Ovis aries) makes an unparalleled contribution of food and fiber. The great advantage of these small ruminants is their ability to digest the cellulose of wild...

Vitamin B Complex: Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Pyridoxine, Cobalamin, Folic Acid

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

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...The history of the discovery of the B vitamins includes both the recognition that particular diseases can result from dietary inadequacies and the subse quent isolation of specific nutrients from foods that have been found to prevent...

Horses

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

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...The horse represents one of the most successful outcomes of animal domestication, but for a variety of reasons it has not been widely used as a source of human food. Very little of the exacting attention given this creature over the past...

The Mediterranean (Diets and Disease Prevention)

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

0

...The basic elements of healthful diets are well established (USDHHS 1988; National Research Council 1989; USDA/USDHHS 1995). They provide adequate amounts of energy and essential nutrients, reduce risks for diet-related chronic diseases...