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Muscovy Ducks

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Of the two species of domesticated anatines, the Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) is larger, less vocal, and characterized by a fleshy protuberance on the head of the male. It is a duck of tropical American origin, whose wild ancestors...

The Caribbean from 1492 to the Present

Jeffrey M. Pilcher

Jeffrey M. Pilcher is Professor of History at the University of Toronto, Canada. He is the author of books on food in Mexican and world history, including the prize-winning Que vivan los tamales! Food and the Making of Mexican History, The Sausage Rebellion: Public Health, Private Enterprise and Meat in Mexico City and Food in World History. He is also editor of the Oxford Handbook of the History of Food. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...Following 1492, the Caribbean basin became a cultural meeting ground that remains unsurpassed for the variety of influences: European, Asian, African, and American. At times, the clash of cultures led to tragedy, such as the destruction...

Cooking techniques as markers of identity and authenticity in Costa Rica’s Afro-Caribbean foodways

Cooking Technology : Transformations in Culinary Practice in Mexico and Latin America

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...When learning about the Costa Rican provinces in the third grade of elementary school, the main facts students are taught about Limón are as follows: Limón’s capital is Puerto Limón, Costa Rica’s international harbor on the Atlantic Coast...
...Anthropology, Identity, and Global Food Production Technologies The distribution of genetically modified and hybrid seed by multinational corporations into societies that are dependent on local seed sources for food production raises...

All in One Pot

Rice and Beans : A Unique Dish in a Hundred Places

Berg, 2012

Book chapter

...Introduction Shared ideologies of food preference are fundamental for national and subnational identities. Food preference is a socially constructed concept in which both consumers and producers define what is “good to eat” (Smith...

Native Americans

Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia Volume 2 : The Americas

© ABC-Clio Inc, 2011

Encyclopedia entry

...Overview The term Native American encompasses an extremely broad spectrum of peoples spread across the various regions of the United States; it is therefore impossible to speak of Native Americans...

The Caribbean, Including Northern South America and Lowland Central America: Early History

The Cambridge World History of Food

© Cambridge University Press, 2000

Encyclopedia entry

...In writing the history of culinary practices, there is a tendency to emphasize the ethnic character of diets (González 1988). Yet nowhere are historical entanglements more apparent than in the international character of modern cuisine, even...

Extract from Diet, Health and Status among the Pasión Maya: A Reappraisal of the Collapse

Food History: Critical and Primary Sources : Classical and Postclassical Eras

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

Book chapter

...The results of paleodietary and paleopathological investigations in the Pasión provide little support for models that emphasize environmental pressures in the collapse of Classic Maya society. Bone chemical data indicate that Pasión diets...

Jamaica Coat of Arms

Rice and Beans : A Unique Dish in a Hundred Places

Berg, 2012

Book chapter

...Jamaica had a coat of arms three hundred years before it acquired its own flag and the associated trappings of a modern nation-state. Granted in 1661, soon after the island became an English colony, Jamaica’s coat of arms had at its center...

Aruba and Bonaire

Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia Volume 2 : The Americas

© ABC-Clio Inc, 2011

Encyclopedia entry

...Overview Procuring salt, conducting the slave trade, and establishing ports of trade—rather than developing sugar plantations—were the goals of the Dutch explorers who made the six islands...