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Risk, Blame and Culture

Brigitte Nerlich

Brigitte Nerlich is Principal Research Officer, Institute of Study of Genetics, Biorisks and Society, University of Nottingham. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

3

... of reaction and interpretation emerge (see Nerlich on ‘natural attitude’, 2004). FMD struck the UK suddenly and the policy of slaughter, chosen as the established ‘cleansing ritual’, turned it into a tragedy of quite epic proportions. People...

The Politics of Food

Marianne Elisabeth Lien

Marianne E. Lien Associate Professor in Social Anthropology,University of Oslo. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

2

... concerning food and risk. She shows how consumers use food purchasing and food consumption as strategies for political activity, while at the same time forming part of a particular governmentality of risk-management. Brigitte Nerlich also...

Dogs, Whales and Kangaroos

Marianne Elisabeth Lien

Marianne E. Lien Associate Professor in Social Anthropology,University of Oslo. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

2

... Jacobsen, Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Marit Melhuus and Brigitte Nerlich for useful comments to an earlier version. This chapter is inspired by ongoing projects that are part of the research program ‘Transnational flows of concepts and substances’...

Handling Food-related Risks

The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

0

...In the Nordic countries, it has become increasingly popular to call upon the so-called ‘ordinary consumer’ in order to solve different societal and political problems. Food politics and environmental politics have been particularly prone...

The Politics of Taste and Smell

The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

2

... Jay Winter, Banan al-Sheikh and Elia Zureik. Also, I thank the Truman Institute in Jerusalem for its support and Lisa Perlman for editing. A special thank you for the comments by Marianne Lien and Brigitte Nerlich. Many people contributed...
...Introduction On 4 November 1871, distinguished foreign officials residing in Japan gathered for a dinner party organized by the Japanese Foreign Ministry and commemorating the emperor’s birthday. The party took place at the Hotel...

Epilogue

Anne Murcott

Anne Murcott is Professorial Research Associate, Food Studies Centre, Department of Anthropology, SOAS University of London and Honorary Professor, School of Sociology & Social Policy, University of Nottingham, UK. Among her books is The Sociology of Food: Eating, Diet and Culture (with Stephen Mennell and Anneke van Otterloo). In 2009 she received an honorary doctorate from the University of Uppsala. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

2

... paid for cheap food comprises a significant part of the semantic field portrayed in Brigitte Nerlich’s chapter in the opening section of this book. And it needs only a slight alteration in viewpoint to recognize that his concerns...
...Adulteration: The action of adulterating; corruption or debasement by spurious admixture.Safety: The state of being safe; exemption from hurt or injury; freedom from danger. Introduction Recently, I walked quickly...

The Rhetoric of Food

The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

1

... and understandings (see Nerlich, this volume). Heradstveit adds ‘The aim of rhetoric is invoking (these) established and emotionally loaded connotations in the recipient’s mind, in order via metaphorisation to transfer them to a new political context’...

Enjoyment and Choice in an Age of Risk

The Politics of Food

Berg, 2004

Book chapter

1

... that have hit Europe over the last few years both exemplify and reinforce this tendency to see food as potentially dangerous: dioxin in Belgian chickens, foot-and-mouth disease in British livestock (see Nerlich, this volume), and of course...